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Platinum Jubilee concert: Mummy laughs and cries with us all, says Prince Charles

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“Thank you,” says the Queen’s son, in a heartfelt tribute ahead of the final day of celebrations.
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Justin Thomas admits he surprised himself with odds-defying PGA Championship comeback win

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Thomas admitted to CNN’s Don Riddell after the event that it was 1.2% more than he would have given himself.

Against all odds, the 29-year-old dazzled with a round-best three-under 67 to put himself within a shot of leader Mito Pereira.

A disastrous double bogey on the 18th for the Chilean left the fate of the Wanamaker Trophy to a playoff between Thomas and fellow American Will Zalatoris, with Thomas holding his nerve over three holes to clinch the second major of his career.

In doing so, he completed the joint third-largest 54-hole comeback in major history. Only Paul Lawrie and Jack Burke Jr, trailing by 10 and 8 shots at the 1999 British Open and 1956 Masters respectively, had overturned greater deficits, according to ESPN Stats and Info.

As a spectacular solo performance on Sunday coincided with Pereira’s late dip, the stars aligned for Thomas to pull off a comeback of historic proportions.

“When you’re that far behind in a major, you can’t do it all yourself — you need some help,” he said. “I understood that it was going be tough for those guys just as it was for me to try to win the tournament. I executed when I needed to and it was just enough.”

Triumph at Southern Hills Country Club ended a five-year wait for a major victory for Thomas, having lifted the Wanamaker Trophy at Quail Hollow Club in Charlotte in 2017.

A serial winner on the PGA Tour with 15 victories to his name, Thomas is no stranger to silverware, but even he didn’t expect to wait so long to taste more major glory.

“When it (winning a major) happens you think it’s gonna happen the next time you play — you really do,” he said. “When things are going well, especially in this sport, it’s easy. The ball bounces the right way, the putts slip in, guys do what you need them to do in the leaderboard — stuff just happens.

“But when it’s not going well, you have no idea if and when it’s gonna happen again and over five years I’ve definitely had a lot of those moments. I’m just very, very glad to be back here now.”

Thomas prepares to play his second shot on the 18th hole of the sudden-death play-off.

‘Crashing’

With the US and British Open championships on the horizon for June and July, Thomas will be hoping that his Tulsa triumph could spark a memorable summer. And looking forward to those events, Thomas believes that simply playing each shot as it comes could hold the key to more silverware.

“Obviously, I know and think that if I play well I should and could have a chance to win,” Thomas said. “But I can’t necessarily go in saying I expect to win because I just have to take it for what it is.

“I have to be a little bit more hole-and-shot oriented as opposed to the entire-week oriented because if I do the things I’m supposed to do as the week goes on, I could be sitting here more often.”

For now though, the only thing an exhausted Thomas is really looking forward to is a good rest.

“It’s a lot, I don’t think it’s really set in,” he said.

“I know all the emotions and excitement has definitely hit me in terms of crashing — I’m very tired and worn out, but I’m very excited.”


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Abbott: US baby formula plant linked to national shortage resumes production

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“We’re also working hard to fulfil the steps necessary to restart production of Similac and other formulas,” Abbott said, referring to its more mainstream products. It plans to ramp up production as quickly as possible “while meeting all requirements”, it said.

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Iran's Khamenei accuses 'enemy' of stirring up protests

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His comments come after several weeks of demonstrations in cities over the rising cost of basic foods.
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Epsom Derby: Desert Crown wins 243rd edition of famous race as Princess Anne steps in for the Queen

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Queen Elizabeth II’s Platinum Jubilee

Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II watches from the balcony of Buckingham Palace during the Trooping the Colour parade in London on Thursday, June 2.

Queen Elizabeth II’s Platinum Jubilee

Prince Harry and his wife Meghan, the Duchess of Sussex, depart St Paul’s Cathedral in London after attending a service honoring the Queen on Friday. Harry and Meghan, who flew from the United States for the jubilee celebrations, were warmly welcomed by a crowd outside the service. Ahead of the event, there was much speculation in the British press over how the couple would be received following their decision to step back from the royal family and move to California two years ago.

Queen Elizabeth II’s Platinum Jubilee

Catherine, the Duchess of Cambridge, smiles as she arrives at St Paul’s Cathedral on Friday.

Queen Elizabeth II’s Platinum Jubilee

More than 400 people were invited to the event recognizing the Queen’s lifetime of service. The congregation included key workers, teachers and public servants as well as representatives from the Armed Forces, charities, social enterprises and voluntary groups, according to Buckingham Palace. London Mayor Sadiq Khan was among those in the audience.

Queen Elizabeth II’s Platinum Jubilee

Prince Charles arrives for Friday’s service. Another one of the Queen’s sons, Prince Andrew, was notably absent after testing positive for Covid-19.

Queen Elizabeth II’s Platinum Jubilee

The theme of Friday morning’s event was public service. It included Bible readings, prayers and congregational hymns to honor the Queen’s 70 years on the British throne.

Queen Elizabeth II’s Platinum Jubilee

Harry and Meghan arrive at St Paul’s Cathedral.

Queen Elizabeth II’s Platinum Jubilee

Britain’s Prime Minister Boris Johnson pauses while inside St Paul’s Cathedral. Johnson was cheered and booed by the crowd when he arrived for the service.

Queen Elizabeth II’s Platinum Jubilee

A member of the military stumbles Friday while on duty ahead of the service.

Queen Elizabeth II’s Platinum Jubilee

A woman holds a cutout picture of the Queen while waiting outside St Paul’s Cathedral on Friday.

Queen Elizabeth II’s Platinum Jubilee

People gather outside St Paul’s Cathedral to watch the arrivals.

Queen Elizabeth II’s Platinum Jubilee

The Queen prepares to touch the Commonwealth of Nations Globe to start the lighting of the Principal Beacon outside of Buckingham Palace on Thursday.

Queen Elizabeth II’s Platinum Jubilee

A Platinum Jubilee beacon is lit by Lord Provost Robert Aldridge and Commander of Edinburgh Garrison Lt. Col. Lorne Campbell at Scotland’s Edinburgh Castle on Thursday. More than 1,500 towns, villages and cities throughout the UK, Channel Islands, Isle of Man and UK Overseas Territories would come together to light a beacon to mark the Jubilee.

Queen Elizabeth II’s Platinum Jubilee

People pack The Mall in London for Thursday’s Trooping the Colour parade.

Queen Elizabeth II’s Platinum Jubilee

The Queen walks out onto the Buckingham Palace balcony during the Trooping the Colour parade.

Queen Elizabeth II’s Platinum Jubilee

Catherine, the Duchess of Cambridge, waves during a carriage procession on Thursday. Joining her on the carriage were her three children — Prince George, Prince Louis and Princess Charlotte — as well as Camilla, the Duchess of Cornwall.

Queen Elizabeth II’s Platinum Jubilee

Planes spell out the number 70 as they fly over Buckingham Palace on Thursday.

Queen Elizabeth II’s Platinum Jubilee

Queen Elizabeth II’s Platinum Jubilee

A 124-gun salute is fired at the Tower of London as part of the Trooping the Colour parade.

Queen Elizabeth II’s Platinum Jubilee

The Trooping the Colour event involved 1,500 soldiers and officers, 400 musicians, 250 horses and 70 aircraft, according to the UK Ministry of Defence.

Queen Elizabeth II’s Platinum Jubilee

Three of the Queen’s great-grandchildren— from left, Prince George, Prince Louis and Princess Charlotte — ride in the carriage procession on Thursday.

Queen Elizabeth II’s Platinum Jubilee

Prince William, left, rides on horseback next to his father, Prince Charles, during the Trooping the Colour parade.

Queen Elizabeth II’s Platinum Jubilee

The Queen’s Guard marches during the Trooping the Colour parade Thursday.

Queen Elizabeth II’s Platinum Jubilee

The Queen is joined by members of the royal family on the Buckingham Palace balcony on Thursday.

Queen Elizabeth II’s Platinum Jubilee

Thousands of people flocked to central London for the celebrations Thursday.

Queen Elizabeth II’s Platinum Jubilee

A military band performs on Thursday.

Queen Elizabeth II’s Platinum Jubilee

Four of the Queen’s great-grandchildren watch the parade from a window of Buckinghamp Palace on Thursday. From left are Prince George, Prince Louis, Princess Charlotte and Mia Tindall.

Queen Elizabeth II’s Platinum Jubilee

A member of the Coldstream Guards holds souvenir programs ahead of the start of Thursday’s parade.

Queen Elizabeth II’s Platinum Jubilee

Prince Edward, right, rides in a carriage along with his wife Sophie, the Countess of Wessex, and their children, James and Louise.

Queen Elizabeth II’s Platinum Jubilee

The Mounted Band of the Household Cavalry takes part in the parade Thursday.

Queen Elizabeth II’s Platinum Jubilee

A man wears a Union Jack suit as people gather on The Mall for Jubilee celebrations on Thursday.

Queen Elizabeth II’s Platinum Jubilee

Police officers line up on The Mall ahead of the Trooping the Colour parade on Thursday.

Queen Elizabeth II’s Platinum Jubilee

A member of the Buckingham Palace staff cleans the balcony ahead of the Trooping the Colour parade on Thursday.

Queen Elizabeth II’s Platinum Jubilee

Crowds gather in London for the parade.

Queen Elizabeth II’s Platinum Jubilee

Australian Prime Minister Anthony Albanese lights the Commonwealth Beacon for a Jubilee celebration in Canberra, Australia, on Thursday.

Queen Elizabeth II’s Platinum Jubilee

Some royal fans had Union flags applied to their faces as they gathered along The Mall in London on Thursday.

Queen Elizabeth II’s Platinum Jubilee

People wear masks of the Queen and one of her dogs as they attend Jubilee celebrations on The Mall on Thursday.

Queen Elizabeth II’s Platinum Jubilee

Anita Atkinson, who has collected more than 12,000 items of royal memorabilia, makes her way to a tea party in Durham on Thursday.

Queen Elizabeth II’s Platinum Jubilee

People sing the national anthem as they gather along The Mall on Thursday.

Queen Elizabeth II’s Platinum Jubilee

A boy poses with a Union flag on The Mall on Wednesday.

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Cuba floods: At least two dead as heavy rain hits island

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Havana residents knee-deep in water as the aftermath of Hurricane Agatha hits the Cuban capital.
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Shot dead by Sri Lankan police while trying to get fuel

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The UN and human rights groups have warned authorities in Sri Lanka against using excessive force at largely peaceful protests during a growing economic crisis.

For weeks, the police have been accused of heavy-handedness during protests, though authorities say the use of water cannon and tear gas is to restore order as tensions escalate.

But the family of a young father who was shot dead by police say they are still fighting for justice.

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Male Basketball Team, D’Tigers Accuse Nigerian Government Of Corruption, Greed Over World Basketball Body, FIBA Ban

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D’Tigers, the Nigerian male basketball national team, has condemned the way the country’s government has been running the sports.  
 
This follows the withdrawal of Nigerian basketball teams from international competitions by President Muhammadu Buhari’s government.



International Basketball Federation (FIBA) had subsequently banned the Nigerian female basketball team, D’Tigress, from the upcoming 2022 FIBA Women’s World Cup.
FIBA chose Mali, as the next ranked team from Group B of the FIBA Women’s Basketball World Cup 2022 Qualifying Tournament in Belgrade, to participate in the tournament.
The world basketball governing body said it would announce whether further disciplinary measures would be taken against Nigeria.
In May, Sunday Dare, minister of youth and sports development, said President Buhari had agreed to withdraw Nigeria from competing in any international basketball competition for the next two years.
 
The minister added that the withdrawal was part of efforts by the government to revamp the sport from the grassroots.
 
The move came amid the ongoing power tussle within the Nigeria Basketball Federation (NBBF).
 
On Thursday, FIBA announced that the D’Tigress have been kicked out of the 2022 FIBA Women’s Basketball World Cup after the Nigerian Government withdrew all teams from international competitions.
 
D’Tigress had qualified for the World Cup billed for Sydney, Australia, starting in September 2022, after defeating France and Mali in the Group B of the FIBA Women’s Basketball World Cup 2022 Qualifying Tournament in Belgrade.
 
Reacting to the news, D’Tigers, the male team on its official Twitter account, condemned the government for not allowing the 2021 Afrobasket Women’s Champions to prove themselves on the global stage.
 
“We are saddened by the forced withdrawal of ‪@DtigressNG from the World Cup. We hope someday Nigeria will be led by a government without corruption & greed. The future of Nigeria basketball is extremely bright and we are being held back by our leaders,” the tweet read.
 
“Nigeria is the best basketball country in Africa. This didn’t happen because of our leaders. It happened because of the players and staff who put their blood, sweat, & tears into their work. Nigeria’s biggest threat from progress is Nigeria. We need change.”
 

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Florida property prognosis “better” but challenges remain

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The Florida legislature gathered for a special session – “I can’t recall the last time we had a special session specifically on insurance,” Ulrich said – last week, seeking to address Florida’s property insurance crisis amid fears that domestic carriers would be unable to procure reinsurance.

Two bills were passed into law, creating a $2 billion reinsurance fund and a $150 million pot for retrofitting homes.

The bills also prevent insurers from denying coverage to people with roofs that are over 15-years-old and aims to limit the fees attorneys can charge in certain circumstances. Further, a heightened condominium safety regime was brought in, a reaction to the June 2021 Surfside condo collapse that killed 98 people.

The reforms “probably constitutes the largest, most meaningful package of tort reform that the legislature has passed in my time here,” said Ulrich.

Five Florida property insurers have fallen into liquidation since the start of last year, according to the office of Florida chief financial officer Jimmy Patronis.

Meanwhile policyholders have faced spiralling rates, or have been unable to acquire cover, representatives said, as the bill worked its way through the legislature.

More than 875,000 policies were in force with Citizens, meant to be Florida’s property insurer of last resort, as of last week.

Florida’s exposure to catastrophe risk, namely hurricanes, has pushed pricing and capacity issues in the market, at times causing upward pressure on rates and resulting in “scarcity” of cover, Ulrich said.

However, the litigious environment in the state is massively to blame for the issues now being faced, carriers have said. Roofing claims have morphed into a particular insurance industry bugbear.

Ulrich said: “What we have seen here in Florida, at least in probably the last 12 to 15 years, has really been less about cat risk, and more about the extraordinarily litigious environment in which we operate.”

Despite accounting for 8% of claims, Florida accounts for 76% of litigation across the US, according to National Association of Insurance Commissioners figures.

The legislature’s closure of loopholes around sinkholes and assignment of benefits over the past decade has driven an increase in solicitation of homeowners to bring first party claims, according to Ulrich.

Bad actor attorneys have moved from one tactic to another in a bid to “mine lawsuits”, Ulrich said, and last year’s attempt by the legislature to close in on first party litigation has yet to pay dividends.

However, between last year’s changes and last week’s legislation, which effectively ends assignment of benefits, Ulrich said he is feeling more optimistic about the future of the Floridian property market.

“For the first time since I’ve been at the association, the legislature really addressed some of the underlying litigation issues that exist here in Florida, and have really tackled some of the incentives that are built in for attorneys and other third parties to file lawsuits against insurance companies,” Ulrich said.

“Between what passed last week, and what passed in 2021, the long-term prognosis for the industry is probably much better than it has been. But in the short term, we still have some challenges.”

Ulrich said “a handful of companies, and all likelihood they’re the worst performing companies in the market” may still face rating action if they fail to arrange reinsurance cover, but current reports have suggested that the situation will not be as dire as it could have been.

As for next steps, Ulrich said: “If those things that passed last week and last year don’t show a significant impact on the number of lawsuits being filed, the legislature will have no choice but to come back and make additional changes to first party lawsuits.”

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Platinum Jubilee: Queen misses Derby but celebrations continue

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At the same time, the Earl and Countess of Wessex will carry out two engagements in Northern Ireland. Prince Edward – the Queen’s youngest son – and his wife Sophie will meet children taking part in multicultural street performances, join in with art and craft sessions, and speak to people sharing their personal memories of meeting the Queen.

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